Vitamin D supplement ‘reversed severe pre-diabetes in healthy children’

Vitamin D supplement ‘reversed severe pre-diabetes in healthy children’: Study What to Know Liver disease is the leading cause of death among patients at all ages in North America and Europe Liver disease can…

Vitamin D supplement 'reversed severe pre-diabetes in healthy children'

Vitamin D supplement ‘reversed severe pre-diabetes in healthy children’: Study

What to Know Liver disease is the leading cause of death among patients at all ages in North America and Europe

Liver disease can lead to cirrhosis, which is the most common chronic liver disease; and cancer of the liver, known as hepatocellular carcinoma

Patients with advanced liver disease are at greater risk of complications including organ failure and death

New research presented Sunday at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases annual meeting suggests bariatric surgery can lower the risk of cirrhosis and cancer of the liver.

Currently, one in three Americans is battling type 2 diabetes, but just as many adults are battling cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer, a problem that leaves patients at increased risk of liver failure or death.

To see whether surgery could be a better strategy than diet and medication for patients with severe liver disease, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania created a series of studies on 367 patients in Europe, the United States and North Africa.

They found bariatric surgery lowered cirrhosis and cancer risk and improved survival for both chronic liver disease and cirrhosis.

According to the study authors, the greatest results were found in patients with advanced liver disease (the second most common cause of liver transplantation), a condition characterized by tumors of the liver, cirrhosis of the liver, a lower-than-normal body weight, proteinuria or excess blood protein in the blood, constipation, hemorrhoids, weight gain and symptoms like abdominal pain, bleeding and nausea.

“Prolonged biliary failure or cirrhosis of the liver could result in failure of the heart, kidney or nervous system,” said Dr. Bernd Wiebe, a bariatric surgeon at Penn. “With advanced liver disease, the only other option is liver transplantation. The general perception has been that patients with advanced liver disease have to have liver transplant because they are not technically ‘life-prolonging.’ However, our data suggest that relatively advanced patients who are serious about preserving their lives actually have a better prognosis with bariatric surgery.”

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