Russia fails, shoots down anti-satellite missile just ahead of ISS connection

A Russian Anti-Satellite Weapon Test (ASBM) early on January 10 forced the International Space Station (ISS) to go into Safe Haven mode due to an uncontrolled debris wave. No crew members on board the…

Russia fails, shoots down anti-satellite missile just ahead of ISS connection

A Russian Anti-Satellite Weapon Test (ASBM) early on January 10 forced the International Space Station (ISS) to go into Safe Haven mode due to an uncontrolled debris wave.

No crew members on board the ISS were injured, NASA reports. While Safe Haven has previously been used to shelter astronauts and cosmonauts during launch separations, Russia on January 10 issued the order to shelter those on board the station.

Russian Mission Control Directorate general Yury Malenchenko said that the experiment was not abandoned as the satellite had already disintegrated before its failed mission.

#Siberia (say hello to my friend) – Happy New Year and merry Christmas. After the countdown with all the teams, the control center prepared the warning that Space Station participants will be asked to remain undisturbed in their stations in the support compartment. pic.twitter.com/nIfusG43HX — SIRIOS (@SIRIS_Astro) January 9, 2019

As a result of debris created from the above-mentioned Anti-Satellite Weapon Test, the debris wave created an “extremely high” level of radiation, according to NASA.

Anton Orlov, lead of the astronaut protection department, said: “Two of the ISS crew members have switched over to sleeping quarters in an enclosed compartment in case of emergency situations on the station.”

According to Russian media outlet LifeNews, the ISS flew past over the Russian Satellite 102 set to rendezvous with the ISS on January 10 but it did not try to re-enter the Earth’s atmosphere as a result of the floating debris.

A previous test by the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences of an Anti-Satellite Weapon (ASBM) (January 2006) and the attempt in 2010 to fire an satellite to disable the ISS was unsuccessful.

The Russian Anti-Satellite Weapon Test failed on January 9 at the start of the switch to Safe Haven mission which followed the failure of the rocket test.

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