North Carolina sees sunrise on Historic 2020, plans for historic 2022 DNC

North Carolina has reached another milestone in the wake of the historic winter flooding and Tropical Storm Florence that the state has endured for more than six months. It’s starting the countdown to its…

North Carolina sees sunrise on Historic 2020, plans for historic 2022 DNC

North Carolina has reached another milestone in the wake of the historic winter flooding and Tropical Storm Florence that the state has endured for more than six months. It’s starting the countdown to its Come Home Year campaign, “Welcome Home: 2021 and Beyond.”

“The first six months of the year would normally be busy with construction season. However, 2017 is one of those special seasons, and many areas across North Carolina are being transformed into fun and new experiences for North Carolinians,” the governor said in a statement. “We are living in the middle of history right now. In only six months, North Carolina has come through these dangerous storms stronger and braver than ever before.”

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper signed an executive order on May 25 pledging support for visitors to North Carolina during the year leading up to the 2022 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte. The governor said the 2022 convention will be the first time since 1988 that Charlotte hosts the quadrennial event, which would call for an influx of thousands of visitors to the city.

The tourism package is to include a marketing campaign, potential expansion of the state’s economic impact from the convention, and potential revitalization of Convention Center complex in downtown Charlotte.

“Come Home 2022 will not only bring national attention to North Carolina and Charlotte, it will introduce us to thousands of visitors and jobs for years to come,” Cooper said.

If all goes as planned, it will mark the first time since 1944 that the DNC will be held in North Carolina. The natural beauty of the state, which has the largest contiguous swatch of coastline in the United States, and its training facilities are considered strengths for visitors and domestic policy makers.

Cooper said new capital budget has provided $26 million in money for the campaign, the largest amount the North Carolina Office of Tourism will receive since the early 1980s. “Come Home” is a nickname that signifies the presence of North Carolina.

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