Monaco Grand Prix will be reduced to three-day event from 2022, commission rules

• Red Bull boss Christian Horner’s move follows Formula One Commission ruling • Federation Internationale de l’Automobile president Jean Todt called for greater collaboration The Monaco Grand Prix will be reduced to a three-day…

Monaco Grand Prix will be reduced to three-day event from 2022, commission rules

• Red Bull boss Christian Horner’s move follows Formula One Commission ruling • Federation Internationale de l’Automobile president Jean Todt called for greater collaboration

The Monaco Grand Prix will be reduced to a three-day race format starting in 2022, according to the sport’s new president Jean Todt. The Formula One Commission unanimously voted in favour of the move on Friday in a decision that the Monaco race promoters submitted to the commission before the weekend.

A one-off European date move to Salzburg in the spring of 2020 was also approved as a result of pressure by fans and French president Emmanuel Macron.

The 10-point Formula One Commission aims to promote the benefits of F1 for fans and communities and to strengthen the existing commercial framework.

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Todt has said he expects many more changes to F1 before the next round of negotiations in 2019.

The meeting in Paris also unanimously adopted the introduction of 11-race, one-off European weekends in addition to the one-off, one-weekrestaurant‑weekend on the continent. This will be known as the Europe Round.

The commission also supported the introduction of non-stop night-race weekends in the US in 2020.

Race weekends in Asia, Australia, Mexico, South Africa and China will not change. They will continue to feature Friday qualifying and Saturday and Sunday full races, in theory with varying format variations, depending on the circuit.

The commission also endorsed the possible introduction of a second European GP, either in Italy or Britain.

The suggestion of an Italian GP was inspired by the former Ferrari principal Jean Todt and became the subject of an extensive consultation between the three unions representing F1’s 20 race promoters, the engines suppliers and the teams.

The chairman of the F1 Championship Drivers’ Association (CCDA), Marcus Ericsson, said: “This is great news for drivers, who have called for more European rounds for the past four years.”

After years of disagreement, F1 has previously staged one-off European races in Monte Carlo, Hockenheim and Valencia.

Christian Horner, the Red Bull team principal, said: “We are all in agreement on the proposals and look forward to starting discussions with F1.”

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