America’s most over-the-top vintage kitchens and buildings to take your home the next step.

More than 100 houses received upgrades and designer makeovers, including new decking, roofs, exteriors and kitchens. They were inspired by five retro American movies: “Ghostbusters,” “Gremlins,” “Problem Child,” “Animal House” and “Indiana Jones and…

America’s most over-the-top vintage kitchens and buildings to take your home the next step.

More than 100 houses received upgrades and designer makeovers, including new decking, roofs, exteriors and kitchens. They were inspired by five retro American movies: “Ghostbusters,” “Gremlins,” “Problem Child,” “Animal House” and “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.”

​Title: “How to Make Luxury Real Estate Pop: A Housing Guide From 1970 to the New Millennium”

Publisher: Bonnier Corp.

Distributor: Bonnier Corporation

Price: $39.95 ($29.95 for paperback)

Excerpt: “C.W. Scott and his wife Mabel were living in a three-story brick house on Central Avenue in Scugog. As they looked out across their front lawn, they imagined the bold and serene new features that new owners of this modern house—the epitome of a contemporary ranch—would have ready for them in the future. Scott figured that if he spent just $2,000, his wife would never have to worry again about the how long it would take to get out of bed in the morning.”

More from this book:

This $2.3 million, nine-bedroom house in Rockville, Maryland, was one of 100 houses with upgraded and a New World twist that appeared in the “American Dream Homes: Decades at the Top” series in December 2017.

This house is not for the faint of heart. It is a brick Colonial listed at $1.3 million in Vienna, Virginia.

​​“If you’re looking for a subtle New World feel, look to San Francisco,” says Bryan White of Autohaus Zaida, a San Francisco-based builder that offers single-family houses in three different styles, from craftsmanship-focused “Piezo” homes to “Munday” designs that emphasize high ceilings and real-wood plank flooring. “This house doesn’t do subtle,” says Justin Dyson, a sales associate at Long & Foster. “I don’t think it was ever intended to be subtle, but it was built to stand on its own.”

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